Book
Financial Openness and National Autonomy

Opportunities and Constraints

The authors of this book tackle the question of whether national policy autonomy is still possible, in the process challenging the new orthodoxy, and the dangers attendant upon deregulation. They explore the `political economy' of financial openness, and the political nature of recent developments such as the ascendency of private financial interests and a reduced role for government regulation. The book includes both general historical and theoretical approaches, as well as case studies of various countries, such as Australia, Mexico, and Pakistan. It represents a major contribution in the political economy of international finance.

Table of contents
  1. 1. Introduction
    Juliet B. Schor
  2. Part I
    2. Openness, Financial Innovation, Changing Patterns of Ownership, and the Structure of Financial Markets
    A. D. Cosh, Alan Hughes and Ajit Singh
    More Working Paper | Openness, Innovation and Share Ownership
  3. Part I
    3. Are World Financial Markets More Open?: If So, Why and With What Effects?
    Robert B. Zevin
    More Working Paper | Are World Financial Markets More Open?
  4. Part II
    4. Financial Markets versus Governments
    Robert Pringle
    More Working Paper | Financial Markets and Governments
  5. Part II
    5. Exchange Controls and Policy Autonomy: The Case of Australia, 1983-88
    Andrew Glyn
    More Working Paper | Exchange Controls and Policy Autonomy
  6. Part II
    6. Structural Determinants and Economic Effects of Capital Controls in OECD Countries
    Juliet B. Schor and Gerald Epstein
  7. Part III
    7. International Capital Markets and the Limits of National Economic Policy
    Gerald Epstein and Herbert Gintis
    More Working Paper | International Capital Markets and the Limits of National Economic Policy
  8. Part III
    8. Capital Mobility and Policy Effectiveness under a Credit Run: The Mexican Economy in the 1980s
    Jaime Ros
    More Working Paper | Capital Mobility and Policy Effectiveness in a Solvency Crisis
  9. Part III
    9. Black Markets, Openness, and Central Bank Autonomy
    Tariq Banuri
    More Working Paper | Black Markets, Openness, and Central Bank Autonomy
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